Monday, 1 May 2017

M10 Tank Destroyer, 1/11 Anti Tank Regiment, Italy 1944


© Copyright Golf Alpha Zulu 2017

Following on from the Achilles M10 I completed earlier this year, here is the second of the M10 variants I have been working on: a 3-inch equipped tank destroyer as operated by the South African 6th Armoured Division in Italy from the second quarter of 1944.

It depicts a vehicle in the second battery of the 1/11 Anti-Tank Regiment in the camouflage pattern common to many of the vehicles used early in the South African's Italian campaign. Reference photos of these vehicles during the campaign show them to be heavily cluttered (and weathered), and I attempted to create some of that character. I think part of the excessive baggage is due to the South African M10s seldom being used in the anti-tank role - they were rather used as additional field artillery, and were often in static firing positions for extended periods.

From ww2online.org: Captioned as: “17 Nov 44. 5/MM-44-30001. Fifth Army, Porretta Area, Italy. An Italian woman washes clothes behind a line of American made M-10 T.D’s. of 3/24 A.T. Bat., 1/11 A.T. Regiment, S.A.A. 6th S.A.A. Division firing on German positions flanking Fifth Army front on Hwy [Highway] #64 near Bologna. Photo by Hartman. 3131 Signal Service Co.” Porretta Area, Italy. 17 November 1944

The model is based on the now out-of-production resin kit from Warlord Games. I have mixed feelings about this kit, and about the resulting model. First, I built the bulk of it simultaneously with the Rubicon plastic M10, and the extra effort that all resin kits demand made it feel like a bit of a chore to build. Second, the kit, lets be fair, was a bit of dog from a fit and finish point of view. A lot of careful filling and filing was required to get the angular hull shape even vaguely acceptable. On the other hand, a lot of the characteristic details of the M10 are well represented, even if a bit exaggerated and cartoony, and it appears to have a bit of depth to it that the more accurate Rubicon kit seems to lack.

© Copyright Golf Alpha Zulu 2017

© Copyright Golf Alpha Zulu 2017

© Copyright Golf Alpha Zulu 2017

© Copyright Golf Alpha Zulu 2017


For the most part, the kit was built without modification. I found it was missing the driver and radio-operator's hatch covers, so these had to be press-moulded from another Warlord M10. I added the horizontal baggage rails (that appear in many of the photos) using styrene strip, and the stowage itself is an assortment of bits from Die Waffenkamer, Rubicon Models and Warlord Games. Crew member heads in berets were culled from Warlord British infantry packs. The .50 Browning and periscope gunsight were spares from the Rubicon kit. Again, decals were a mix of bits from Marshall/Starmer, Dom's Decals and Warlord.


Thursday, 20 April 2017

28mm Partisans: Heavy Supports

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2017. All rights reserved.



My small partisan force (take a look at the basic infantry and their light supports) is great fun to play using rules like Bolt Action - they are a classic horde force that tends to gain victories by sheer force of numbers. Well-equipped they are not, but they can generate a surprising amount of small-arms firepower. This is great for infantry-only conflicts, but as soon as my opponent fields armored vehicles, even lightly armored troop transports and armored cars, they really find themselves desperately short of heavier weapon options.

With these reinforcements I hope to plug that gap.

First up is a captured Italian Cannone da 75/27 howitzer. It is a bit of a beast for a partisan force - too heavy to be easily towed - and those that were captured in the Balkans were more likely to be destroyed than deployed. But in Bolt Action terms I will use it to represent a light howitzer, the only artillery available to partisan forces. It looks the part.

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2017. All rights reserved.

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2017. All rights reserved.

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2017. All rights reserved.




The kit is the fine offering from Empress Miniatures in their "Italian Conflicts" range, and the crew are from the Empress SCW range, some with headswaps. The Cannone da 75/27 kit is wonderfully detailed, but be warned, it comes without any form of construction diagram, or even a parts list, so a fair bit of sleuthing is required before and during assembly. This is not helped by there being plenty of variations of this artillery piece, and a basic internet search throws up a bewildering array of images that, for the most part, dont appear to share details represented by this kit. That said, I eventually got perfect construction advice from an Empress staff member, and managed to plot the one correct route through a horde of incorrect possibilities...

Next, another recruit from the Empress Miniatures SCW range, with a head swap or two, providing my partisans with a much-needed medium machine-gun option.

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2017. All rights reserved.

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2017. All rights reserved.



In an infantry battle, no-one likes facing an auto canon. And they tend to keep light armored vehicles honest.  Light enough to be transported in the carts and mule trains that make up the transport options for my partisans, this is a really force multiplier. This 20mm Breda, or more correctly, Cannone-Mitragliera da 20/65 Modello 35 is from Company B. A tricky little kit to put together, mostly due to the very soft metal of the casting, it none-the-less produces a neat model.  It represents the weapon without one of the more elaborate anti-aircraft sights, which I thought was an appropriate arrangement for my part-timers. The crew received headswaps from the Empress and Warlord Games ranges.

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2017. All rights reserved.

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2017. All rights reserved.

Monday, 6 March 2017

The White Scout Car (and another overlooked vehicle)


Of all the vehicles used by the South African 6th Armoured Division, the White scout car is probably the most anonymous. Very few photos of this vehicle appear in the various histories of the Division. In two volumes of William Marshall's Camouflage and Markings of the the 6th South African Division there are just three photographs of Whites, one of which is incorrectly captioned as a M5 halftrack, and one of which is included only because it is depicted being towed by a captured SdKfz 7. In fact, Marshall only allowed himself 3 lines of text regarding Whites, noting "a small number of these vehicles were issued to the Division."

In fact, they were the second most numerous armored vehicle in the division (170 in use), only being outnumbered by the Sherman tank variants (255 in use). They outnumbered Universal Carriers 2 to 1, and M5 halftrack variants 4 to 1.

Which is a roundabout way of saying that if you want to build a representative force of the SA 6th Armored Division, best you include a few (or more) White scout cars.

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2017. All rights reserved.

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2017. All rights reserved.

This pair are resin kits from Die Waffenkamer, depicted as Natal Mounted Rifles vehicles in the 1943 Italian pattern camouflage. Baggage has been sourced from a wide range of manufactures, and the .50 Browning is a plastic molding from Rubicon models. Drivers are from Die Waffenkamer and Warlord Games, and the trooper manning the Browning is built from the Warlord Games plastic British Infantry kit. Decals from Starmer, Dom's Decals and Warlord Games.

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2017. All rights reserved.

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2017. All rights reserved.

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2017. All rights reserved.


Depicted here along with the Whites, is another vehicle which is often overlooked - the common or garden Dispatch Rider's (Don R) motorbike. The division used a mix of bikes from Ariel, BSA, Matchless, Triumph and Harley Davidson, and together almost 500 motorcycles were issued to the division. After the ubiquitous 3-ton truck (about 2500 in use), they were the second most numerous type of soft-skin vehicle in use.

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2017. All rights reserved.


Ironically, given the broad range of bike manufacturers used, I believe this kit depicts a model not used but the division - the Norton 16H. The rider is a Perry figure, but the Perry bike itself appeared to my eyes to be far too small. Instead, I used the motorcycle from the Foundry "Home Guard" range.

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2017. All rights reserved.



Monday, 30 January 2017

T17 Staghound, Natal Mounted Rifles, Italy 1944

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2017. All rights reserved.

At the end of World War 2, the South African 6th Armoured Division listed 15 Staghound T17E armoured cars amongst their equipment. It was not recorded how these were allocated within the Division, and according to Marshall's Camouflage and Markings of the 6th SA Armoured Division, there is only one (poor) photograph known to depict a South African Staghound, and unhelpfully, the AoS number is obscured. The logical allocation would either be to divisional and brigade HQ squadrons, or to the regimental HQ of the dedicated reconnaissance units - the Natal Mounted Rifles. Given that we know the divisional HQ used M8 Greyhounds, the idea that the Staghounds were then rather allocated to frontline regiments is not implausible. The photograph also doesn't provide any clues as to the colour or patterns used - as the vehicle is appears extremely dirty. So this is, again, a speculative representation, and I will be happy to be proved incorrect if anyone can bring to light more complete information on their use in the SA 6th.

The Staghound was a big beast of an armoured car - 14 tonnes worth - with armour as thick as a light tank, and with some innovative drivetrain features. They arrived on the frontline just in time for the Italian campaign, and saw service until the end of the war. In fact, they continued to serve with many commonwealth forces well after World War 2 - the Rhodesians, for example, kept their's going until 1976.

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2017. All rights reserved.


This miniature was built from the Die Waffenkamer resin kit - pretty much out of the box with the exception of the replacement of pintle-mounted .30 Browning with one that came from a Rubicon Models stowage set. One of the crew figures is the kit offering, the other is from Warlord Games. Stowage is either scratch built, or from Die Waffenkamer and Rubicon Models, and decals are from a variety of suppliers: Warlord, Dom's Decals, and Starmer.

I really enjoyed the process and the result of this build. While unashamedly a wargames miniature, it has piqued my interest in building a good scale model of one - who knows, the Staghound might end up being my first 1/35 build in decades...

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2017. All rights reserved.


© Golf Alpha Zulu 2017. All rights reserved.

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2017. All rights reserved.



© Golf Alpha Zulu 2017. All rights reserved.

Monday, 16 January 2017

M10 Achilles, 1/11 Anti Tank Regiment, Italy 1945

© Copyright Golf Alpha Zulu 2017

Here is the first of the M10 variants I have been working on: a 17-pdr equipped Achilles operated by the South African 6th Armoured Division in Italy during the last months of the Second World War.

It depicts a vehicle in the second battery of the 1/11 Anti-Tank Regiment (an amalgamation of the 1st and 11th regiments, due to manpower shortages). The conversions from the 3-inch equipped vehicles were undertaken in April 1945, and it is unsure how many of them saw action before the war ended.

© Copyright Golf Alpha Zulu 2017

The model is based on the Rubicon Models kit, and I had ordered it with the intention of building a M10A. I wasn't even aware that the kit included the option of building the Achilles variant (and the M36 Jackson), so when presented with the opportunity to build one in plastic, I took it.

As with all the Rubicon offerings, the kit was extremely well presented, with clear instructions and comprehensive decals. The sprues were free of flash and significant split lines, and the fit of parts was absolutely first class. Proportions, scale and details look correct. As mentioned, above, the kit can be used to produce a comprehensive range of vehicle variations.

On the downside, the track detail leads a little to be desired, and the undersides of the track guards were omitted from the kit. This last point might not bother many builders as the tracks would obscure the omission, but for my build process (painting before fitting the track assemblies) it would have resulted in overspray into the interior spaces (visible through the open turret.) Also, the grouser racks proved to be a bother. First, they are supplied with grousers cast on, and it takes a fair bit of careful work to cut them off. Given that the majority of M10s were equipped with tracks that could not fit grousers, it means the building to the kit instructions will likely result in an incorrect depiction of the vehicle. Also the racks are fitted into a recess on the hull sides, meaning they cannot be positioned differently, or omitted altogether, without some tricky filling of the recesses, and replication of the rack mounting points.

Extended baggage racks and interior floor detail (only visible by peering into the turret) were added. No crew figures are supplied with the kit, so my crew were recruited from various Warlord Games kits. Baggage and stowage was sources from the Rubicon "Allied Stowage Kit 1", Die Waffenkamer, and scratchbuilt. Decals from Marshall/Starmer/Dom's Decals and Warlord.

© Copyright Golf Alpha Zulu 2017
© Copyright Golf Alpha Zulu 2017


Monday, 7 November 2016

Pretoria Regiment Shermans, Italy 1944-5

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016
A pair of Shermans to add some teeth to my 28mm South Africa 6th Armoured Division force. They are my first attempts at SCC 15 - the British and Commonwealth interpretation of Olive Drab. By all accounts, this paint color faded towards light green, as opposed to the US paint mix, which faded towards a brown ochre hue.

I have been putting off adding olive drab vehicles to my South African force, simply because I enjoy the look of the Light Mud + Black camo pattern, and wanted to keep the force coherent when fielded together. However, that did limit me to vehicles used for a particularly narrow time period - that is from April until September 1944. From that point, more and more SCC 15 - and indeed US Olive Drab  - vehicles become evident in pix of the division.  That is not to say there were not camo pattern vehicles around after September 1944, and it is clear from the evidence that the SA 6th Armoured division was not particularly diligent about the general order to repaint, and the latitude afforded by the order - it gave a range of priorities for repainting - was well exploited... But the bottom line is this - if I want to accurately depict the SA 6th Armoured in Italy, I know I have to become friends with SCC 15.

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016


The Firefly VC is the older Warlord kit released in resin, and was a fine kit to put together. A glance at the newer plastic kits compared to the resin kit suggests that the detail on the resin kit is a bit crisper, and "deeper" than the plastic kit - which betrays its origins as a scale-up of a 15mm kit. (I haven't yet built a Warlord plastic Sherman VC, so this criticism might be misplaced and unfair, but my first impression of the plastic offering is that the detail is "flat" and "soft".) Crew figure is from Perry Miniatures, and the baggage bits and bobs from Die Waffenkamer and Warlord Games.

It depicts a vehicle from C Squadron, Pretoria Regiment. Its not overly clear from the evidence I have at hand as to exactly when the Fireflies were issued to the South African tank regiments, and when and in which units they were replaced by 76mm Shermans. There are photos of the Pretoria Regiment at a parade in 1945 with both 76mm Shermans and Fireflies, so clearly not all were retired in 1944 as suggested by some sources.

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016


The Sherman 105 is the (now discontinued) M4A3 kit from Rubicon Models. Very easy to put together, it produces a model with plenty of neat detail. However, the track detail leaves a lot to be desired, and I assume this was one of the reasons it was withdrawn from the Rubicon range (and apparently there were detail errors on the 76mm turret option included in the kit). Rubicon have announced it is to replaced by a more detailed Sherman kit, and the 3D renderings of the track parts do indeed show much more detail. Again, crew from Perry Miniatures, and stowage from Warlord and Die Waffenkamer.

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016


It depicts a vehicle from HQ Squadron, Pretoria Regiment. Again, it is not clear to me exactly how the 105-equipped Shermans were distributed amongst the troops, but Marshall does mention that they are eventually grouped together to provide additional field artillery support, so I have assumed that the HQ squadron was a good enough place for that to happen.

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016


And finally, another couple of family portraits, the last one together with an earlier attempt at a Sherman V as used as an OP vehicle by a field artillery regiment...

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016

Sunday, 16 October 2016

Konflikt '47

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016

Just off the painting table, a kit for the weird WW2 game by Warlord and Osprey - Konflikt '47.

This is the "Spinne" light mech from Warlord and Clockwork Goblin. This kit was lightly modified - I added steps and grab handles, an antenna mount, baggage, and some mesh turret hatch covers. I wanted the commander figure to be a bit more dynamic than the kit offering, but all the panzer crew I had on hand were a bit too "authentic". So with a Heer infantryman torso from the bits box, and a gasmask head from Westwind Miniatures, I managed to knock together something more to my taste. Yes, I am fully aware that webbing and helmets and turrets dont go together, but guess what,  it is ultimately a for fantasy genre, and if there is anywhere strict authenticity can be dispensed with, its here. Camo is the 1948 "leopard toad" pattern in the western Europe colour mix.


© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016

And then a unit of genetically modified wolf/dog/human stormtroopers... the majority of these figures are from Westwind miniatures - one is from Warlord Games.

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016

And finally, a few Steppe ghouls produced by mixing parts from the Mantic ghoul and zombie sprues, and the Warlord Games plastic Russian infantry sprues. (Figures in the background are Westwind Russian zombies...)

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016

© Golf Alpha Zulu 2016